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Heading to Mongolia

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Qldelsie Silver Member Giles Cooper
Benowa, Queensland, Australia   AUS
Very interesting to see, John. Thank you.
Great minds think alike. We are planning something even more extensive, which will be going on in the next couple of weeks (hopefully !). Full length, all the way back to cover from in front of the radiator all the way to the fuel tank, but in 3 pieces so it can be removed in sections more easily as required (if required ? smiling smiley ) It will not have any bolt head hanging down anywhere (unlike on the 100/6 photos you posted), but will be mounted to tabs that will be welded to the side of the chassis rails (or similar), so they are out of harms way. The undertray will also spread sideways to the sills, which if you remember from our previous photos have been strengthened internally. Cooling may then become an issue, so we are planning for that with judicious gaps in the undertray as required. This will then allow us to have a void between the central chassis rails and the intermediate sills, between the two outriggers, and about 4-5 inches deep. This section is going to be boxed in, not only providing increased strength, but also, with clever work in the floor just in front of the seats, a storage area where heavier items like tools and emergency equipment like shovels etc can be stored, low down (for CoG) and in between the axles. (We are trying to avoid heavy stuff in the boot / trunk, hanging out behind the poor old rear axle and small rear dampers !
As this has never been done before, a lot of this is experimental - Which is why we want to have 12 months driving the car before we leave for China, so anything that doesn't work as planned can be removed / replaced / whatever !!
Giles

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speedsports Joe J
Brisbane, Queensland, Australia   AUS
Hi Giles,
Another Queenslander here, thought you might like to know that you are not the first Austin Healey to complete the Peking to Paris (London) route albeit backwards that honour went to a 1960 3000 Mk 1 in 1996.

A book was published about the trip, 'The Road to Beijing' by David Brayshaw in 2000.

While the Dunlop alloy wheels are a fantastic bit of gear for racing, would suggest you not put them on something that will be travelling extensively over 4WD only essentially roads.

Wayne mentioned the Peking to Paris book of the 2007 recreation using authentic cars that largely ran in the original event and I can also recommend it but alos the DVD of the ABC televised series. I have both and find the book is better for detail and the DVD very entertaining.

There is a significant amount of material about previous entries in 'modern' Peking to Paris, including books about Volvos, RR and others rrunning.

However, the books relating to the 1907 event, an event that really put the motor car on the map as not being just a rich sporting mans folly, rather having the ability to cover vast distances relatively reliably.
Being a long time de Dion Bouton owner, I have in my library three original 'Pekin to Paris' editions by Barzini of 1907/8 in English, French and German.
Additionally, have the two beautiful large books were published by Spyker (in Dutch) and de Dion Bouton ( in French). Although these manufacturers did not win, their effort to finish was superhuman for the day.

de Dion Bouton were very good at marketing around the turn of the century and published many postcards (came into use with the arrival of the new century), effectively the email of the day. They published two series of twelve postcards featuring photographic scenes from their Peking to Paris book.

In closing, curiously here in Australia there are at least four AH owners who also own de Dion Boutons and am aware of some in the UK!

Best of luck with the venture.

Best regards
Joe

NaDaDawgRacer John Jones
Waxhaw, NC, USA   USA
Protecting the gearbox is definitely a good idea, and I am sure that the plate will not be in direct contact with the case as that will just defeat the purpose. I had given some thought to how to reinforce the chassis rails without not adding to much weight. Thought about filling them solid with an aerosol foam but would have to make sure that we found one that wasn't to flammable. To protect the fuel tank I thought about something like a bulletproof vest if it could be adequately held in place without the risk of snagging.
John

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Qldelsie Silver Member Giles Cooper
Benowa, Queensland, Australia   AUS
Thanks Joe. Yes, There are a lot o good stories and books out there about both the event and some of the characters. I am reading them as time permits and getting a much more complete picture of the true nature and spirit of the event. Fascinating.
Yes, I was aware of David's journey - Coincidentally I am waiting on his book to arrive any day now !! However, to split hairs, he actually drove from London to Beijing, and did not compete in the ERA Peking to Paris event. I only said that we were the first Healey to compete in the Peking to Paris event. But, minor point, although I still maintain we will be the first Healey to compete in the Peking to Paris event !!
It was much the same when I drove my Lotus up the Ice Trucker's Highway to the Alaskan Arctic Circle and Coldfoot. I said I was the first and so far only person to do that trip in a Lotus. I know other Lotus' live in Fairbanks, but to the best of my knowledge, no one has ever been (stupid enough to drive their Lotus') up the Haul Road to Coldfoot and the Atigun Pass !! If someone tells me different, not a problem, but until then.........
There must be some link between de Dion Boutons and A Healeys ???
Giles

Qldelsie Silver Member Giles Cooper
Benowa, Queensland, Australia   AUS
John, I am keeping a record of the weights of everything we take off the car, and everything we put on the car. Hopefully, when all is finished, it will be lighter than it was originally ! More importantly, the weight will be better distributed - Or at least, that is the plan. There will certainly be less weight hanging out behind the rear axle at the back.
Giles

Qldelsie Silver Member Giles Cooper
Benowa, Queensland, Australia   AUS
In reply to # 194465 by Trevor Parker Before you get too far along, have you checked the regulations about a different gearbox. This might be one part you can change but as far as I know the cars have to be original.

Yes Trevor, all checked out and approved to change gearbox in writing. smiling smiley

brianbj7 brian chandler
kamloops, bc, Canada   CAN
Hello Giles and Ashton,

Recently completed my BJ7 (from a total rust bucket), and have a few of comments which may help in your PtoP quest
Parts quality varies as know, that said i have had extremely good performance parts and service from the following

Denis Welsh (DW) in the UK, they specialise in competition parts and provide excellent quality and service (I live in western Canada, and delivery has not been a problem either.

Steering & axles (DW)
New steering column & box, identical external look with reengineered internals by DW, no wander and steering is tight through lock to lock.
New hubs all round
Steering axles, DW only supply their latest forged competition version. They have their own forgings made and machine in house.
(After NDT discovered a few tiny hairline cracks at the root of the stub axle, i opted to go for new axles) Great peace of mind knowing the wheels wont fall off.

Brakes and other parts (DW)
New front discs (i kept the original drums on the rear)
Also purchased numerous gearbox and OD parts.

Kilmartin sheet metal in Austrailia
Chassis, new chassis, excellent fit and quality, they also include a third web inside the main chassis rails for stiffness and strength.
Also purchased a lot of internal body panels, high quality and a few needed just minor adjustment.
Delivery was no problem, and Kilmartin bolted my chassis with another also bound for W Canada

In Canada
i have had excellent support from Bob Yule at the Healey Farm in Ontario, he has been restoring AH for many years and only supplies parts that do the job.


Your trip sounds exciting to say the least, not sure if you are serious about having another AH along, i'm certainly interested.

Dont hesitate to contact me if you have any other questions

bye for now
brian

brianchandler1949@gmail.com
250 299 1739








Prices were not inexpensive but neither were they over the top, for a 60 year old vehicle its satifying to get reliable parts.

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Qldelsie Silver Member Giles Cooper
Benowa, Queensland, Australia   AUS
Thank you Brian, your information very much appreciated, I assure you. Kamloops eh ? I have very good friends on a property at Vavenby, and came through Kamloops on both my 2012 Lotus drive and on my way home from Europe in my Toyota last year !! Small world.
We have found ALL the Healey parts suppliers to be excellent - both information wise, and supply wise. They all have slightly different things, so we have used Denis Welch, AH Spares in the UK and also Kilmartin here in Aus. We normally receive the orders here within a week or 10 days, and of course the landed costs are similar to UK prices because we do not pay UK Goods & Services Tax, so that usually covers the cost of shipping - Unless you have something really heavy !
While quality is especially important with stub axles, axles etc, price is also a major consideration when one is doing a complete rebuild like you did, and we are almost doing (everything except the chassis itself !) so we do have to share our business around a bit.
And last week, ironically, we received something from Canada - from Michael Salter in Ontario, after he answered our "wanted" ad on this forum !!
With Ashton and I both active in the Lotus world for many years, we are well used to having to import virtually everything !!
As far as another Healey joining us on the P2P is concerned, that would be fantastic. However I believe the entries closed a few months ago as it was quite heavily over subscribed, even though it does not start till June 2019 !! Maybe we should do the US event ? Or you could come over here for one of the Aussie events like COTT

I am on a very steep AH learning curve, so I may well come back with many more questions as we progress.
Cheers,
Giles

Rozzer Ashton Roskill
Sydney, NSW, Australia   AUS
May I just add my very grateful thanks to Giles'; as the other half of this madcap event, I am immensely grateful for the brains trust here being willing to share your thoughts, experience and ideas; Giles and I are both on a steep learning curve, and every day we learn something new.

So many thanks to everyone for your continued willingness to share ideas (and more!)

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Qldelsie Silver Member Giles Cooper
Benowa, Queensland, Australia   AUS
In reply to # 193957 by NOHOME If you have not, you should really read this book:

Peking to Paris: Life and Love on a Short Drive Around Half the World

http://www.nyjournalofbooks.com/book-review/peking-paris-life-and-love-short-drive-around-half-world


Based on what I recall from reading the book, there is no such thing as making the suspension points as bomb proof as possible.Forget bullet-proof, that ain't going to cut it.

Pete

Ashton and I have both just read this book. While we enjoyed the tale, we are bemused by her factual errors. We can find no one in the list of participants named "Matthieu" or "James", and when one competitor refers to his car as a "1927 Chevrolet 75 roadster" (page 59), I can find no reference to such a car in the participants listing. I can find a 1927 Chrysler 75 roadster, but surely no self respecting Chrysler owner would never call his car a Chevrolet ?? Surely that would be like a Porsche 356 owner referring to his car as a Volkswagen, or a Beetle ?????
Makes you wonder how much literary licence she actually used ?
Don't get me wrong, still a good tale, but......
My wife is now reading it - and enjoying it. Like Dina, she is also of the "car-sick" tendancy !!

Qldelsie Silver Member Giles Cooper
Benowa, Queensland, Australia   AUS
Cooling. One of our big concerns is how close the fan blade sits to the radiator core. Any movement whatsoever of engine or radiator is a potential for the blade to strike the core - and even a glancing blow could be serious if not terminal.
First we bought a 5 blade plastic fan - We only realised recently that this fan is hollowed out on the back side, which effectively moves the fan blades back 1.5 cms or so from the core.
Then we looked at the core itself. We discussed alloy (light weight and thinner) but decided against it because it is harder to fix on the road if damaged. We then found a great radiator shop that uses a more modern core that is much more efficient, and is also slightly thinner than the original. This reduced thickness has allowed the core to be moved forwards in the frame about another 1 - 1.5 cms.
On a trial fitting, although we have put a narrower header tank on there, it still sticks out towards the fan a little, and is thus a potential problem site. But when trial fit in the car, we found we can tilt the top of the radiator about 1-2 cms forwards, thereby gaining more space not only between the fan and the upper part of the core, but also between the header tank.
We are going to change the mountings too, from metal firm mounts to rubber ones, with two rubber doughnut type mounts underneath the radiator down to the chassis cross member, and also 2 side mounts to new L brackets, again putting the mounts in compression, not shear. Thus the radiator will be independent of any chassis flexing - Hopefully ! And at the same time, we have gained some 4 -5 cms of additional clearance between the fan and the core.
We were also thinking of installing an oil cooler, partly to increase oil volume slightly, and partly for cooling. But didn't like the idea of an alloy oil cooler out front there, liable to stone damage and consequent sudden and complete loss of oil. Then our radiator man showed us an oil cooler that is copper tube and mounts INSIDE the lower tank of the radiator, so is not exposed to any damage from stones. I believe these are used as transmission coolers on many modern cars ? Anyway, brilliant solution, and now done.
We will test the efficiency of the cooling when we get the car on the road by Christmas Day 2017 - That is the height of Australian summer and humidity, so is a great time to take it out in the hills and find out if it works or not !


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wayneo Wayne Watkins
Sydney, NSW, Australia   AUS
1956 Austin-Healey 100 "Horace"
1959 Triumph TR3A "Trumpy"
1965 Nissan Silvia
1989 Mazda MX-5
Hi Giles , Doctor John Matheson , sometimes spelled as Mathieson has competed in a few Pekin to Paris runs & was in the 2007 run in his Rolls Royce phantom V with his wife Jeanne Eve and he has a son James I think who is a motoring writer and has been in at least one . Maybe this woman's spelling of Matthieu could have meant to be Matheson . There is a guy in the NSW Healey Owners' Club Neville Stirton who is an expert on Healey radiators for modern day use and has a radiator business in Sydney who may be able to help if your Qld guy is stumped at all .

Qldelsie Silver Member Giles Cooper
Benowa, Queensland, Australia   AUS
Thanks Wayne. I am sure someone will straighten me out re the real names of Matthieu, James etc before too long ! I think that John Matheson's motoring writer and motorcycle racer son is called Mick, at least that is what is stated in "The Great Peking to Paris Expedition" book, which details their recreation of the 2005 re-creation of the 1907 event, and was co-authored by Mick, Warren Brown,and Lang Kidby. An amazing read.

Re the radiator, I think the one we have is perfect - I hope so anyway ! If we find out later that something isn't right, we will keep Neville Stirton's name in mind, although moving parts around the country really slow us down preparation wise, and time is our biggest enemy. Our current radiator shop is within walking distance of the CCC workshop where the car is located, so he is able to walk over and check measurements etc, which makes it really easy !
But all help and suggestions are more than welcome, I can assure you.
Giles


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wayneo Wayne Watkins
Sydney, NSW, Australia   AUS
1956 Austin-Healey 100 "Horace"
1959 Triumph TR3A "Trumpy"
1965 Nissan Silvia
1989 Mazda MX-5
You are correct , he is Mick & he drove/rode the Contal recreation that they built from a new BMW bike & Warren Brown the cartoonist also competed as did the other Aussie in an old Wolsley ( 2007 ) . All these cars plus the Itala were prepared in John's old factory in Botany Sydney . I have a signed copy of the book you pictured here , but have been reorganising my messy house and cannot put my hands on it . I think Andrew Snell is the Wolsley guy's name . He is a very mechanically clever guy .

NaDaDawgRacer John Jones
Waxhaw, NC, USA   USA
Giles
I am sure that you know that the biggest problem with the cooling on Healey is the fact that in original configuration is the lack of air control thru and around the radiator. Air can go around the radiator behind the grill and the fan may actually just churn the air vs pulling it thru the radiator. Make sure that all areas in front of the radiator are closed off then make a full shroud around the fan on the back of the radiator. Not necessarily original but it will greatly improved cooling
John

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