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The 100-Six Forum

100-6 pistons and rods question

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carrera1955 Robert L
San Salvador, salvador, El Salvador   SLV
Hello Amigos,

I have a quick technical question for you. Apparently the engine I pulled from my 1959 100 six is not the correct engine for the car. The engine did not have an engine number on it. nor holes where the rivets might have gone. The engine has the pinch style rods and pistons (clamp rods) It also has though a separate intake manifold. My question is, will the pistons and rods from the 26D type engine, circ pin (pressed pin) fit my engine block and crank. I need to replace the current pistons because the mechanic i am using tried soaking one of them in detergent to loosen it and it got eaten! Rather than trying to find a set of pinch or clamp type pistons, I thought I would just replace the rod and piston with the circ pin type.

I read in the workshop manual that the journal size on both the pinch type rod and the circ rods are the same.

thanks, much

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Randy Forbes Avatar
Parrish, FL, USA   USA
1957 Austin-Healey 100-Six
1999 BMW M Coupe "Blue Car"
1999 BMW M Roadster "Black Car"
2001 BMW M Roadster "Gray Car"
The later floating wrist-pin rods and pistons__in sets__are interchangeable with the pinch-bolt type. This assumes, of course, that the piston diameter is appropriate to the bore in the block winking smiley

Both type of rods fit the Healey crank (100/6-3000 all the same).

Get a load of what I found when tearing this early 100/6 (Longbridge) Healey down; different pistons! Some show knurling on them, a band-aid fix to reuse a piston in a worn bore (knurling raises the metal, reducing clearance, though they will hold more oil between piston skirt and bore).



I used these floating rods, along with new pistons, upon reassembly.



Ultimately, it turned out like this!




lewmac Avatar
lewmac Silver Member Lew McAllan
Hawthorn Woods, IL, USA   USA
1960 Austin-Healey Bugeye Sprite "Buggy" ~ For Sale ! ~
1968 Austin-Healey Sprite "Bluey"
1969 MG MGC "Greeny"
I have a 100-6 engine with approx 9000 miles on it up for sale on eBay. https://www.ebay.com/itm/303028806269.

You could take the 100-6 head, water pump and other peripherals off your engine and be up and running in short time.

The engine is bolted to a pallet for shipping.

Cheers
Lew

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sliproc Avatar
sliproc Kevin Quistberg E
Long Beach, CA, USA   USA
Randy,

What you found is typical of an early "rebuild" probably late '60s or '70s. Back then Healeys were just inexpensive drivers so a mechanic would just fix what was wrong rather than do a complete overhaul to keep the car on the road. Machine shops and junkyards were plentiful and quality machine work was cheap, so a lot used or reconditioned parts were used to keep them on the road as economically as possible. Nobody restored Healeys back then you just fixed 'em up. In '73 my '57 100-6 needed some head work. I took the head to a local machine shop, the guy tore it down, tanked it, magnafluxed it, replaced a burnt valve, a couple of broken springs, then reassembled it, I installed it and it ran great. Total cost for the machine work and parts---$30 bucks!

Randy Forbes Avatar
Parrish, FL, USA   USA
1957 Austin-Healey 100-Six
1999 BMW M Coupe "Blue Car"
1999 BMW M Roadster "Black Car"
2001 BMW M Roadster "Gray Car"
And not just Healeys. I well remember tearing down my 66 MGB engine around 1976-77, and found three (3) different types of pistons in it__one (1) of which used ceramic buttons in the ends of the wrist pin, rather than being retained with circlips. And again, some pistons knurled and others not. I did a full scale rebuild, new +.030" pistons, reground crank, boiled-out block and valve grind. I couldn't do it any other way winking smiley

A little more history on the 100/6 Longbridge engine in my first post; I did the engine and trans only, while the remainder of the car was being restored by another craftsman. The owner of the car bought it from a New Mexico High school, it being a former shop-class car. Might explain some of the economical measures taken, but I can't forgive them for brazing closed the oiling holes on the rocker-arms.



I redrilled the holes.



The lack of oil accelerated wear on the contact tips.



I sent them out to Rocker-arm Rebuilders to be rebushed and fitted to their shaft. Also shown are new lifters to mate with a NOS BJ8 cam (requiring a different oil pump drive spindle & clearancing the block).



Working on British cars = never a dull moment!

In reply to # 208351 by sliproc Randy,

What you found is typical of an early "rebuild" probably late '60s or '70s. Back then Healeys were just inexpensive drivers so a mechanic would just fix what was wrong rather than do a complete overhaul to keep the car on the road. Machine shops and junkyards were plentiful and quality machine work was cheap, so a lot used or reconditioned parts were used to keep them on the road as economically as possible. Nobody restored Healeys back then you just fixed 'em up. In '73 my '57 100-6 needed some head work. I took the head to a local machine shop, the guy tore it down, tanked it, magnafluxed it, replaced a burnt valve, a couple of broken springs, then reassembled it, I installed it and it ran great. Total cost for the machine work and parts---$30 bucks!

sliproc Avatar
sliproc Kevin Quistberg E
Long Beach, CA, USA   USA
Looking back on it that was an interesting period of time, I'd say that most of the Brit sportscars on the road at that time were primary transportation cars which might explain some of these oddball fixes, the idea was to keep it on the road so you could get to work not to get it ready for a car show. Not many people were into restoration because if you had that money you could find a nice well cared for late model used car usually from the original owner. Another option if you had the money was a brand new British sportscar, there were lots of new ones from the dealerships available; MGs, Triumphs, Jensen-Healeys.

Your school auto shop escapee is probably another example of that period. When they got it Austin-Healeys probably weren't worth very much, I can't imagine nowadays letting a bunch of high school kids monkey around with a $50,000 car. As far as your brazed rockers are concerned, with the valve cover off and the motor running they probably thought the squirting oil was due to leaks rather than the way Austin designed it to lube the top end, so they fixed the leaks!

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