Visit our Twitter feed for more great content
AHExp

The 3000 Forum

Healey Blue in Water base!

Moss Motors
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor

Mark63 Avatar
Mark63 Gold Member Mark DeJager
Calgary, AB, Canada   CAN
1916 Harley-Davidson Pre-War "Steroid (bicycle Size Lol)"
1965 Ford Mustang I "Stang"
Hello,
I am in need of an Healey Blue water based paint product. My 63 is now ready for painting and I just cannot find the right supplier for Healey Blue.
Appreciate any and all advise,

Regards,
Mark

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
rusty1c Avatar
rusty1c Peter D
Antioch, CA, USA   USA
1961 Austin-Healey 3000 BT7 "RUBY"
1963 Chevrolet C10 "Rusty"
Mark,
If you go to a PPG automotive paint supplier they should be able to mix up whatever color you need. I've had to do this when matching older paint jobs that have been faded. Start with a color that is close and they can work from there with tints or if you have a piece of metal with the Healey Blue on it they can usually scan it and the computer will come up with a paint formula and they can mix it from there.
Peter

Mark63 Avatar
Mark63 Gold Member Mark DeJager
Calgary, AB, Canada   CAN
1916 Harley-Davidson Pre-War "Steroid (bicycle Size Lol)"
1965 Ford Mustang I "Stang"
Thank you Peter I will see what PPG have to offer.
Regards,
Mark

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
RAC68 Avatar
RAC68 Raymond Carbone
NJ, Jersey Shore, USA   USA
Hi Mark,

Water Based Paint? Although I am not up on automotive paints, I would not have thought a water based formulation would be appropriate, or available, for automotive use. However, when researching, I found that a water based automotive paint system is both available and has been in use for the past decade (at least).

Mark, how did you settle on going with a water based paint and not the most-used/common solvent based systems. What is the benefits you expect to capitalize upon. As I understand, a water medium will have a slower evaporation an setting time as well as the paint's additives will still produce air born toxics (though at a smaller volume). So, what stimulated you to choose this paint approach?

Ray(64BJ8P1)

Mark63 Avatar
Mark63 Gold Member Mark DeJager
Calgary, AB, Canada   CAN
1916 Harley-Davidson Pre-War "Steroid (bicycle Size Lol)"
1965 Ford Mustang I "Stang"
Hi Ray,
Thank you for getting back to me. My paint knowledge (auto) is very limited and I have relied on a number of car buffs I have come to meet within the car world. These were some of the key points that drove me to my decision-
1) Nathan who is doing the chassis and body work has been in the car repair game for plus 30 years and recommended I move away from solvent based to water base. Has used for 10 yrs with excellent results both on application and durability. Easy to apply in shop/garage with minimal air ventilation and is easy to repair paint, say post accident.
2) Alberta is moving in this direction -http://www.outdoorsmenforum.ca/showthread.php?t=20998 and many more on line.
3) When researching for the Healey blue I did find that paints manufacturers recommended were either USA and or European which would have a cost for special order and duties etc.
4) I am lead to believe that in the event of me having to repair post incident a water based repair will most likely be cheaper than a solvent which who knows may be out lawed by then.

Hope this makes sense as the car is now in early paint prep and is looking great.
Cheers,
Mark.

rusty1c Avatar
rusty1c Peter D
Antioch, CA, USA   USA
1961 Austin-Healey 3000 BT7 "RUBY"
1963 Chevrolet C10 "Rusty"
Another reason to use the water base was told to me by a custom paint shop here in my home town is that the colors are more vibrant. Also know that the water base paints are still clear coated with a 2 part clear. it's the same clears used on the solvent based. The solvent based paints used a lot of thinner (reducer) that evaporated off during the drying process so a lot of solvents were released into the air. You of course don't have that problem with water base. The reason you can still use the same clear coats is due to the fact that most clears don't have any thinner added. They are usually the clear and a hardener.
Just be aware that when using water based paints you cannot add "Tap" water as a thinner. You have to use the water that is part of the paint process as it has certain additives in it which tap water doesn't.
Ask me how I know!
Pete

RAC68 Avatar
RAC68 Raymond Carbone
NJ, Jersey Shore, USA   USA
Hi All,

I am always impressed how much I become aware of and/or learn from my on-line interactions.

Peter, how have you become aware that you can't use Tap Water and must use the water that is part of the paint process?

Ray(64BJ8P1)

rusty1c Avatar
rusty1c Peter D
Antioch, CA, USA   USA
1961 Austin-Healey 3000 BT7 "RUBY"
1963 Chevrolet C10 "Rusty"
Ray,
I guess I should clarify my answer a bit as we were using the PPG Envirobase paint system. Maybe this isn't a problem with other paint manufactures. About 5 years ago we bought our first pint of water based paint ( PPG Envirobase base coat) to repaint a hood on a car. We didn't know any better at the time and tried to use tap water as a thinner but it didn't mix well with the paint. We also used tap water as a lubricant to wet sand some imperfections. The base coat started to wash off with the tap water. When we called the paint store we were told that the paint has to use a special thinner and that it isn't pure water, it does have some solvent in it. These are the answers right from the PPG website for their Envirobase paint.

Q. Can I “wet sand” out imperfections in the
waterborne basecoat?
A. After the waterborne basecoat has fully flashed, dry
sanding with 1000-2000 grit sandpaper works very
well for removing dirt nibs and imperfections. A small
amount of SXA330 can be sprayed on the sandpaper as
a lubricant, but dry sanding works just as well. But do
not use water. This can wash off the fresh waterborne
basecoat.

Q. What do I use to clean the spray gun?
A. The Nexa Autocolor™Gun Wash P280-8212 or One Choice®
SWX100 Waterborne Gun Cleaner are both
ideal for cleaning waterborne basecoats. DO NOT clean
the gun in the shop sink and put any of the waterborne
basecoat paint or contaminated water down the drain.
There are VOC’s—solvent—in waterborne basecoat.
Contact your current solvent borne waste hauler for help
in setting up your waterborne waste stream.

Pete

Mark63 Avatar
Mark63 Gold Member Mark DeJager
Calgary, AB, Canada   CAN
1916 Harley-Davidson Pre-War "Steroid (bicycle Size Lol)"
1965 Ford Mustang I "Stang"
Thank you Pete for the Q and A it sure does help better understand the coating.
Regards,
Mark

RAC68 Avatar
RAC68 Raymond Carbone
NJ, Jersey Shore, USA   USA
Hi Peter,

Wow, "Envirobase" seems not to be as environmentally friendly as its name would imply. But then again, if you decide to use this new (decade old) technology to take advantage of its benefits, I would expect you would also have to learn how to use it. I can just picture the owner's look when seeing his water colored Healey parked on a drive after a rain storm with its paint washed off and pooled around its tires.

Thanks for the additional info,
Ray(64BJ8P1)

rusty1c Avatar
rusty1c Peter D
Antioch, CA, USA   USA
1961 Austin-Healey 3000 BT7 "RUBY"
1963 Chevrolet C10 "Rusty"
This paint system is the same as the solvent based system in that it has a color coat (base coat) and a clear coat over it. If you use a two stage paint and just spray the color coat in either water or solvent base, when it dries the color is flat with no gloss. At this stage of the game neither of the paints have any UV protection and they will degrade rapidly. It's not until the cleat coat is applied that the paint job gets it's gloss and UV protection.
Ray at the point that we started having trouble with the paint we hadn't applied the clear coat yet, only the base color (base) coat. We had some places that got dirt in it and we tried to wet sand the dirt to remove it. When we used tap water instead of the special water that's when we ran into trouble. After the color coat dried, we wet sanded it with the correct water and resprayed a couple of more coats. After that dried we sprayed the clear over it and the paint job came out really nice and still looks good to this day.
Pete

RAC68 Avatar
RAC68 Raymond Carbone
NJ, Jersey Shore, USA   USA
Hi Pete,

My comments about rain-washed paint pooling around the tires after a storm were only meant in jest and not serious.

All the best,
Ray(64BJ8P1)

rusty1c Avatar
rusty1c Peter D
Antioch, CA, USA   USA
1961 Austin-Healey 3000 BT7 "RUBY"
1963 Chevrolet C10 "Rusty"
Just wasn't sure! HAHAHA!

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <

To add your reply, or post your own questions




Registration is FREE and takes less than a minute!


Having trouble posting or changing forum settings?
Read the Forum Help (FAQ) or contact the webmaster





Join The Club

Sign in to ask questions, share photos, and access all website features

Your Cars

1958 Austin Healey 100 Six

Text Size

Larger Smaller
Reset Save

Sponsor Links