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Mounting 3000 to rotisserie

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Triumph05 Ken Mutch
USA, IA, USA   USA
I have the use of a car rotisserie, I am not sure how to mount the frame to the rotisserie, any drawings or plans for making the brackets would be greatly appreciated.

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rusty1c Avatar
rusty1c Peter D
Antioch, CA, USA   USA
1961 Austin-Healey 3000 BT7 "RUBY"
1963 Chevrolet C10 "Rusty"
Ken,
Each rotisserie can be a bit different from the next one since there are so many manufacturers. I mounted my car to the rotisserie I built using the front bumper mounts and then tack welded the rear brackets to the ends of the frame cross member that runs from left to right under the trunk floor. I've included a couple of pictures, hope they help.
Pete
Pete


Attachments:
Back from sand blasting & epoxy prime 1.JPG    64.4 KB
Back from sand blasting & epoxy prime 1.JPG

frame back from paint, bottom-1.jpg    57.2 KB
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frame back from paint-1.JPG    48.1 KB
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Mark63 Avatar
Mark63 Gold Member Mark DeJager
Calgary, AB, Canada   CAN
1916 Harley-Davidson Pre-War "Steroid (bicycle Size Lol)"
1965 Ford Mustang I "Stang"
Ken,
I am interested to know what you did when painting was complete and the car was taken off the rotisserie. Did you move it onto a trolley of sorts?

Regards,
Mark

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rusty1c Avatar
rusty1c Peter D
Antioch, CA, USA   USA
1961 Austin-Healey 3000 BT7 "RUBY"
1963 Chevrolet C10 "Rusty"
Yes,
That is exactly what I did. I fabricated a dolly out of 1-1/4" square tubing and some 6" wheels.
Pete


Attachments:
1st primer-left rear.JPG    32.8 KB
1st primer-left rear.JPG

1st primer-left side.JPG    35.1 KB
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Mark63 Avatar
Mark63 Gold Member Mark DeJager
Calgary, AB, Canada   CAN
1916 Harley-Davidson Pre-War "Steroid (bicycle Size Lol)"
1965 Ford Mustang I "Stang"
Thank you Pete for the pictures.

rusty1c Avatar
rusty1c Peter D
Antioch, CA, USA   USA
1961 Austin-Healey 3000 BT7 "RUBY"
1963 Chevrolet C10 "Rusty"
Mark,
I went back and looked at my pictures. I actually kept the frame on the rotisserie after it came back from paint and installed all of the front and rear suspension components, steering linkages, the differential, the fuel lines, the gas tank, electrical wiring harness, steering column, wiper motor, heater box and all the brake lines. I tried to install as many of the small components as possible as it was much easier working on the car when it was still on the rotisserie. I gave me easier access to many hard to reach places. Once all the small parts were installed I took it off the rotisserie and put it on jack stands. Then started assembly on all the rest, engine, trans, dashboard, interior and external sheet metal.

The dolly was just used to roll the car around when I was doing the body work. I usually pushed it outside to do all the sanding and primer work to keep as much dust and over spray from the primer out of the garage.
Pete

Mark63 Avatar
Mark63 Gold Member Mark DeJager
Calgary, AB, Canada   CAN
1916 Harley-Davidson Pre-War "Steroid (bicycle Size Lol)"
1965 Ford Mustang I "Stang"
Thank you Pete, this is very informative.
Regards,
Mark

MikeBJ7 Mike Ferguson
Little Silver, NJ, USA   USA
Hi Pete,
Thank you very much for posting this info and pics. I’m about to mount my BJ7 on a rotisserie and was looking for related ideas. I like what you did! I’m copying your front brackets and thinking about the rear.

Question—what gauge flat plate steel did you use?
Thank you!
Mike

rusty1c Avatar
rusty1c Peter D
Antioch, CA, USA   USA
1961 Austin-Healey 3000 BT7 "RUBY"
1963 Chevrolet C10 "Rusty"
Mike,
I used 1/4" plate. With just the body and frame the car is pretty light. I've seen some folks mount the rear of the car to the rear bumper mounts, but they just didn't seem strong enough for me. You might also be able to use the rear mounts for the leaf springs.
Pete

MikeBJ7 Mike Ferguson
Little Silver, NJ, USA   USA
Hi Pete,

Good answer because that's what I bought already, 1/4" x 4" flat steel. :-)

I agree on not using the bumper outriggers. My plan has been to create a ~ 2 foot horizontal "clamp" that encases the two main frame rails where the gas tank sits and have the two rotisserie arms join it in the trunk area. I'm confident it will work, but it does mean a trade-off on re-assembly (e.g., can't install the gas tank, etc. while on the rotisserie). So, a bit more to think about here. Whatever I do, I will post it here when installed.

Thanks!
Mike

MikeBJ7 Mike Ferguson
Little Silver, NJ, USA   USA
Hi Pete -
Sorry to bother you but a few more questions as I'm thinking about your approach to the rear support and like the benefits it provides in terms of being out of the way of everything that you want to install while on the rotisserie.

1. What gauge are your tube/box arms from the rotisserie? 1/8" or 3/16"? Mine has 1/8" tubes but I was considering using 3/16" (2.5" x 2.5"winking smiley because of the length of the extension to reduce flex, but not sure if that's overkill.

2. How exactly did you fit the 1/4" plate to the frame cross-member? It's hard to tell from the pics. Guessing that's a hockey stick shaped plate that you made by welding two pieces together and then tacked the short stub flat up against the cross-member. Correct or other approach? I really want to understand this because I'm impressed you were able to support the axle and differential with just support at these points.

3. And, while I'm thinking of it, how tricky is it to tack 1/4" plate to 50+ year old ~15 gauge steel?

Thank you very much!
Mike

rusty1c Avatar
rusty1c Peter D
Antioch, CA, USA   USA
1961 Austin-Healey 3000 BT7 "RUBY"
1963 Chevrolet C10 "Rusty"
Hi Mike,
Always ask questions it's never a bother and I'm always happy to help.
1. My tubes that extend from the rotisserie toward the frame are 2" x 1" with 1/8" wall thickness.

2. Correct, I cut 2 pieces of 1/4 " plate the same size as the frame ends, 2" x 3". Then welded the plates to the frame ends with weld beads about 1-1/2" in length on three sides. The plates were "L" shaped. I made these by welding the 2" x 3" sections to pieces of 1/4" x 3" x 13" . Like the hockey stick you mentioned.These formed the short and long side of the "L". I then drilled 2 holes in the extension arms to bolt the plates to the arms. I did it this way to get the extension arms located below the frame of the car so that nothing would be in the way.


3. I used a 110v Lincoln MIG welder to do all the welding. I have found that you get a much better weld by really cleaning the metal by removing any surface contaminants, paint rust grease etc..
You want to leave the metal clean but not polished smooth. I get better welding results by leaving the cleaned metal with a rough scratched finish like you get when using a coarse grinding wheel.

I've attached a picture of one of the mounting plates that I had left for the rear. They are 13" long, 3" wide at the narrow end and 5" wide at the widest end. You can see the rusty portion of the "L" shape where this was flush against the end on the frame cross section. Hope this makes sense!
Any more questions , please don't hesitate to ask.
Pete


Attachments:
IMG_0388.JPG    71.7 KB
IMG_0388.JPG

MikeBJ7 Mike Ferguson
Little Silver, NJ, USA   USA
Hi Pete -

Great info and details...thank you!

I have a Lincoln also--140C, 110V, so with flux core wire can handle the 1/4" plate. I'm going to do some test welding with that plate and some scrap 14 gauge steel to sort out a technique so i don't blow through the lighter metal. Pending confidence from that practice, I think I'll take your approach on the rear.

I'll let you know how it goes, and will post pics when done.

Thanks again!
Mike

MikeBJ7 Mike Ferguson
Little Silver, NJ, USA   USA
Hi Pete -
I'm moving ahead with your design and have another question. What size bolts did you use to adhere the plates to the rotisserie arms? Looks like 1/2" based on holes shown above. But perhaps 3/8".

I have 1/2' bolts but drilling is slow, hence my question.

Thanks,
Mike

Csarneson Chris A
Big Horn, WY, USA   USA
1957 Austin-Healey 100-Six "Lola My Mistress"
Here's a video I made of my car on the rotisserie. It shows how it's mounted. The front was a simple piece of angle iron. The back was made of a couple pieces of angle iron bolted together. Later on I actually took that apart and made an even more elegant one using only 2 welds.


Healey on a Rotisserie Video

Chris

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