Visit our Twitter feed for more great content
AHExp

The Sprite Forum

Early 948cc Engine Restore

Moss Motors
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor

BMac Avatar
BMac Brendan MacRae
Grass Valley, CA, USA   USA
We received a customer's 948cc engine recently and we're going to go through it and restore it. It's from a 1959 Sprite that was originally a Southern California car. The current owner, who lives in Washington State, purchased the car from the original owner's son who had it stored in a barn in Texas since 1988. It also spent some time in Florida as the original owner was enjoying his retirement.

Our mission with this survivor is to restore it to as-new condition. It still maintains its engine engine ID plate and number 9C-U-H-22221 meaning it likely remains standard and hopefully completely unmolested. The owner is keen to keep the Bugeye as close to original as possible, with only moderate upgrades or changes. We're also doing a ribcase gearbox with the engine though the owner has the original smoothcase, as well.

I'll post progress photos here. Should be a fun challenge in that 948's don't come through our engine shop very often as most owners are looking for power over originality.

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <

Attachments:
948_1.jpg    64.4 KB
948_1.jpg

948_2.jpg    79.6 KB
Sign In or Register to view this photo
948_3.jpg    73.1 KB
Sign In or Register to view this photo
948_5.jpg    38.7 KB
Sign In or Register to view this photo
westburn70 Eric Flack
Glasgow, Lanarkshire, UK   GBR
In the UK good up grades are duplex timing chains. Harmonic balanced wheel the fan belt sits in. They have a rubber insert. Metros out of scrapyards were a great source. Fit a remote clutch bleeder. Red rotor in the distributor. Spin on oil filter? Remember in the UK Morris Minors, A35/ A40s used the 948cc so a bit of a cottage industry in the UK
regarding these engines!.

grey1 Avatar
grey1 Mike H
Delta, BC, Canada   CAN
Well now, this looks familiar. I have begun work on a 1960 BE. The original 948 has been rebuilt at some point, probably not long before I acquired in 12 years ago or so. Anyway, I have thoughts about making it capable of keeping up when trying to participate in 2019 traffic flows. There are many options, usually it is suggested to just drop in a 1275, but I really want to try and save this 948. I don't need to be quickest, just a little more jump than the original setup. Thinking of a 1098cc head, larger SU carbs, (perhaps HS2s), LCB exhaust manifold, matching larger exhaust pipe. Improved intake manifold. Perhaps take a small amount of weight off of the flywheel. Then try it out. I repeat, I don't need to be quickest, (my other Healey is a 3000 BJ8-quite happy with that), but this could be a fun experiment. I applaud those that stick to all original 948 specs and performance, but I feel I may find myself avoiding trips where a hill of any serious incline may cost me another days travel time. grinning smiley. With all due respect to those who quite happily campaign their original 948 out there. Good luck with the rebuild. Mike

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
BMac Avatar
BMac Brendan MacRae
Grass Valley, CA, USA   USA
The very first step before disassembly is to preserve the original engine plate. For those unfamiliar, these plates are held in place with two screw nails but most people refer to them as "rivets." To remove them, carefully notch the tops with a Dremel tool and a small cut off wheel. Then it's just a matter of using a bladed screwdriver to back them out just like a regular screw.


Attachments:
IMG_4111.jpg    38 KB
IMG_4111.jpg

IMG_4112.jpg    50.1 KB
Sign In or Register to view this photo
IMG_4116.jpg    49.4 KB
Sign In or Register to view this photo
IMG_4118.jpg    60.5 KB
Sign In or Register to view this photo
PeterC Avatar
PeterC Platinum Member Peter Caldwell
Madison Wisconsin, USA   USA
Mating a 948 with a rib case transmission will be..... entertaining.......



Peter C


Member Services:
Supplying New Old Stock parts for all imports. A LARGE quantity being loaded to our EBAY store stores.ebay.com/worldwideimportautoparts Rebuilding lever shock absorbers for British cars. (608) 223-9400 M-F 9-5 Central or parts@nosimport.com
refisk Avatar
refisk Rick Fisk
Frankenmuth, MI, USA   USA
Piece of cake Peter. Install the later thicker backplate and the right throwout bearing on the ribcase fork and you're done. Blue Bugeye in my avatar photo ran a 948 with ribcase trans at Gingerman last year with a lightened 948 flywheel and standard 948 clutch and pressure plate. smileys with beer

In reply to # 208387 by PeterC Mating a 948 with a rib case transmission will be..... entertaining.......



Peter C

BMac Avatar
BMac Brendan MacRae
Grass Valley, CA, USA   USA
So, Rick, we've heard of folks doing this without issues in the past. But did you notice any issues with the different pivot point on the ribcase cover vis-a-vis engaging/disengaging the clutch?

In reply to # 208390 by refisk Piece of cake Peter. Install the later thicker backplate and the right throwout bearing on the ribcase fork and you're done. Blue Bugeye in my avatar photo ran a 948 with ribcase trans at Gingerman last year with a lightened 948 flywheel and standard 948 clutch and pressure plate. smileys with beer

In reply to # 208387 by PeterC Mating a 948 with a rib case transmission will be..... entertaining.......



Peter C

grey1 Avatar
grey1 Mike H
Delta, BC, Canada   CAN
Interesting Rick. So just how light was that flywheel anyway? Was it the original one minus a few lbs? If so how much did you take off? Just thinking about lightening this original one a bit, so looking for some ballpark final weight, and just for street. Thanks, Mike

BMac Avatar
BMac Brendan MacRae
Grass Valley, CA, USA   USA
Engine is apart. Looks very original. Pistons are standard. Head gasket was changed at some point. Everything looks good but the pin drive camshaft - it has a chipped lobe. I could have it repaired and reground but we have one of our 103 grind pin drive cams on the shelf which will be a good substitute - and will provide more power. Plus, that 103 cam is the later pin drive type with the wider lobes (1/2" vs. 3/8"winking smiley.


Attachments:
IMG_4121.jpg    54.5 KB
IMG_4121.jpg

IMG_4122.jpg    70.3 KB
Sign In or Register to view this photo
IMG_4124.jpg    37.3 KB
Sign In or Register to view this photo
IMG_4125.jpg    57.7 KB
Sign In or Register to view this photo
AN5L8016 Avatar
AN5L8016 Mark Haynes
Nederland, CO, USA   USA
Mike- I turned an aluminum flywheel for my last 948- complete with a steel insert it weighed in a 11 Lbs- WAYY TOO LIGHT for a road car. The flywheel that I just redrilled for my Datsun Clutch is turned to the Stage 1 specs and it came in at 23-25 Lbs IIRC, about 5 lbs lighter than original. Here are the dimensions if you don't have the Special Tuning spec for it. I think I've posted them previously as well..



'58 Bugeye
'66 'Stang


Attachments:
Flywheel weight reduction.pdf    90.9 KB

refisk Avatar
refisk Rick Fisk
Frankenmuth, MI, USA   USA
It's an original flywheel lightened per the BMC competition docs. I have no idea on the weight. It was on the engine when I got it. If you really, really, really want to know I could pull it off the engine and weigh it. The engine is just sitting in the corner of my garage. I installed a 1275 after running at Gingerman. smiling smiley

In reply to # 208392 by grey1 Interesting Rick. So just how light was that flywheel anyway? Was it the original one minus a few lbs? If so how much did you take off? Just thinking about lightening this original one a bit, so looking for some ballpark final weight, and just for street. Thanks, Mike


Attachments:
image.jpg    34.6 KB
image.jpg

refisk Avatar
refisk Rick Fisk
Frankenmuth, MI, USA   USA
It shifts like every other Spridget I've ever driven. I notice no difference whatsoever. And I bought my first Bugeye in 1968, so I've been doing this for a long time. smileys with beer

In reply to # 208391 by BMac So, Rick, we've heard of folks doing this without issues in the past. But did you notice any issues with the different pivot point on the ribcase cover vis-a-vis engaging/disengaging the clutch?

In reply to # 208390 by refisk Piece of cake Peter. Install the later thicker backplate and the right throwout bearing on the ribcase fork and you're done. Blue Bugeye in my avatar photo ran a 948 with ribcase trans at Gingerman last year with a lightened 948 flywheel and standard 948 clutch and pressure plate. smileys with beer

In reply to # 208387 by PeterC Mating a 948 with a rib case transmission will be..... entertaining.......



Peter C

grey1 Avatar
grey1 Mike H
Delta, BC, Canada   CAN
Yes, I recognize that drawing. Thanks for posting again. I did have reservations about making a flywheel too light. So I am just gathering experiences. I appreciate your comments. Mike

grey1 Avatar
grey1 Mike H
Delta, BC, Canada   CAN
Hi Rick, well actually, that is a very generous offer. I would like that, but would only ask that you not rush into it or go to too much trouble. It would just give me a target for my own exercise, which is also not urgent. Thanks! Mike

minimarc Avatar
minimarc Bob Marcum
BREVARD, NC, USA   USA
. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <

To add your reply, or post your own questions




Registration is FREE and takes less than a minute!


Having trouble posting or changing forum settings?
Read the Forum Help (FAQ) or contact the webmaster





Join The Club

Sign in to ask questions, share photos, and access all website features

Your Cars

1962 Austin Healey 3000

Text Size

Larger Smaller
Reset Save

Sponsor Links