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Oil leaking at crankshaft pulley

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pkoot Avatar
pkoot Peter K
Alkmaar, NH, Netherlands   NLD
There is some oil leaking at the crankshaft pulley from my BJ8. So I need to replace the oil seal at the timing cover. But can I remove the pulley with the engine in the car? It seems to me that there is very little space to work with to get the pulley off.

Peter



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-09-13 06:58 AM by pkoot.

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NaDaDawgRacer John Jones
Waxhaw, NC, USA   USA
Engine mounts will have to be unbolted and the front of the engine lifted high enough for the harmonic balencer to clear up he v shaped cross member.
John

San Jose, CA, USA   USA
Disconnect the throttle linkage at the carbs lest you bend it. Don't try to lift at the pan, unless you put a large wooden platform under it (I used a 2 x 4 and had a nice indentation to show for it). Easiest to unbolt the mounts at the chassis (if you have the right size, longer bolts you can put them in to make realignment easier). Getting the big nut off the balancer can be a beeyatch; IIRC it's 1&11/16" (but not sure). You'll need at least a big breaker bar and some way to keep the crankshaft from turning. If it hasn't been done before, consider getting the balancer overhauled (I've seen what happens when they delaminate). Damper Dudes did a good job for me, and they'll sleeve the collar where the seal rides if if needs it (but I see you're in The Netherlands, so hopefully there's someone there who does this). When you reinstall the timing cover make sure the new seal is centered before you pull the bolts down (else you be repeating this exercise in the not-too-distant future).

Bob

Edit: Almost forgot; you have to undo the OD<->chassis (fan saver) tie rod.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-09-13 10:35 PM by Bob Spidell.

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rusty1c Avatar
rusty1c Peter D
Antioch, CA, USA   USA
1961 Austin-Healey 3000 BT7 "RUBY"
1963 Chevrolet C10 "Rusty"
Radiator also needs to be removed.

pkoot Avatar
pkoot Peter K
Alkmaar, NH, Netherlands   NLD
Thanks all for your answers. A lot of work for such a little seal ... and this seal is just 2 years old (complete engine overhaul).

But do I need to unscrew something at the gearbox? Isn't it fixed at the chassis?

Peter



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-09-14 03:29 AM by pkoot.

SimonLachlan Avatar
SimonLachlan Simon Lachlan
Bradninch, Devon, UK, UK   GBR
1962 Austin-Healey 3000 "The Old Banger"
Hi,
Yes, you need to slacken off or undo the mountings at the gearbox end as well as those on the engine. See the attached, taken from my BMC Parts Book, a useful item. You can see that I was probably doing something similar to you at some stage and probably struggled until I found that page. Why the gearbox mountings are shown on the same page as the engine mountings is another topic. May seem logical in retrospect?
It's all a bit of a pain, but it beats taking the engine out.
The one underneath the gearbox, which controls forwards movement - or rather stops it - is something to keep an eye on. If that goes west, your fan could start eating your radiator.
Simon
Have fun!


Attachments:
Page from BMC Service Parts List (with my old notes).pdf    84.2 KB

San Jose, CA, USA   USA
I did it without removing the gearbox mounts. They are flexible, and you're only tilting the engine/gearbox a few degrees.

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pkoot Avatar
pkoot Peter K
Alkmaar, NH, Netherlands   NLD
I'll give it a try. It will save a lot of work.

Peter

petnatcar Avatar
petnatcar Silver Member Peter Carbone
Watertown, NY, USA   USA
Hi Pete,

You may be in for more of a project then it looks.

I had a problem with the Churchill Key holding my front crankshaft pulley from spinning on the crank.

The key had started wobbling in the groove on the crankshaft causing the pulley to rock back and forth, side to side, not front to back.
Besides effecting setting the timing it was annoying and incorrect so I fixed it "in situ".

I raised the front of the engine as far as I could until the valve cover touched the firewall and as you can see in the photos
there was no way that pulley was coming off with the engine in the car.

I didn't loosen the gearbox mounts at the rear but I kept the front mounts centered on their mounting points by inserting a longer bolt.

You still have to contend with the cylinder head hitting the firewall.

Not sure if this is much help but it may give you some insight into your dilemma.

All the best,
Peter Carbone

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pkoot Avatar
pkoot Peter K
Alkmaar, NH, Netherlands   NLD
Well, I've got something to do in the winter. Thanks all.

Peter

bjmay5 Silver Member Bill May
Lago Vista, TX, USA   USA
1960 Austin-Healey 3000 BT7 ~ For Sale ! ~
All,

I have a 1960 BT7 with front oil seal leak. Engine overhauled approx. 20 years ago with about 24,000 miles since. After carefully reading all the posts on the topic of replacing the front oil seal in the car, it appears that some owners have been able to lift the engine in the car high enough to pull the damper/pulley assembly and some haven't. Since the engine can be completely removed from the car, it seems that in raising the front of the engine, it would also have to come forward enough to allow the (back of the) valve cover to clear the firewall enough to allow sufficient rise for the damper/pulley to clear the "V" shaped cross member. If this is true, then putting longer "alignment" bolts through the engine mounts into the frame would prevent the necessary forward movement of the engine for the valve cover to clear the firewall. Also, removing the transmission stabilizing rod (or at least loosening it sufficiently) would be necessary.

If anyone has any actual experience with this issue (i.e., raising the engine sufficiently for damper/pulley clearance), i would appreciate your insights.

Thanks, Bill

San Jose, CA, USA   USA
I did this a couple years ago. Radiator has to come out--obviously--the throttle linkage has to be detached at the scuttle and, as you mentioned, the fan saver tie rod has to be disconnected. I didn't fit longer bolts through the mounts, which makes getting them realigned properly a bit of a challenge, but nothing too curse-worthy. I lifted the engine with a 2x4 under the pan, which produced a nice indentation in the shape of the 2x4 on the bottom of the pan (since replaced). I think you should be able to lift the engine without denting the pan (using a lift with a balancer would be best). I didn't make a conscious effort to pull the engine forward to clear the scuttle, and the valve cover just cleared it. The engine/gearbox/OD probably won't move forwrd too much unless you undo all the rear mounts.

For me, by far the hardest part was unbolting the big nut on the end of the crank that holds the balancer and pulley on the crank. I ended up buying a 3/4" impact wrench and a big socket, but the wrench didn't quite fit in the space between the chassis crosspiece and the bolt, and I had to go at it at an angle which bunged-up the nut pretty bad.

While you've got it out, consider getting the harmonic balancer overhauled. It might need a redi-sleeve where the seal rides anyway, and that's part of the overhaul process.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-02-14 09:55 PM by Bob Spidell.

petnatcar Avatar
petnatcar Silver Member Peter Carbone
Watertown, NY, USA   USA
Bob,
Next time you have to monkey with that crank nut try on of these tools.
You can generally rent them from an auto parts store and they work great because they allow you to
exert a ton of force on that nut without the pulley moving.

Peter


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RAC68 Avatar
RAC68 Raymond Carbone
NJ, Jersey Shore, USA   USA
Hi PeterK,

I do not envy the task you are facing but it may not be as bad as the impressions indicate. Yes, you will need to raise the engine and dismantle many of its constraints including engine mounts, carburetor linkage, etc. mentioned. However, I do recommend you place one long bolt into each engine mount to assure easier alignment when completed as well as to constrain movement when applying substantial torque to the crankshaft nut (especially if NOT using an impact wrench).

Once dismantling and clearing grill, radiator, engine fan, etc. needed to access the nut, make sure you chock your wheels and set the car in gear. Once ready, test the torque resistance of the nut to see how tight the nut is. If it is as tight as I expect, I would recommend renting, borrowing, or in some way acquiring the most powerful electric (assuming you will not have a commercial air compressor) impact wrench available as the impact wrench will apply force in quick hammering bursts and not apply force to the whole car.

If a torque wrench with a long pipe is your only available loosening tool, I would expect the force applied will not be restrained at the clutch but transmitted to the rear wheels. This makes it imperative that you chock up the rear wheels with substantial wedges. As PeterC pictured above, I have also installed bolts into the balancer and used 2 pieces of drilled angle iron (1 applied to the top of the cross member and 1 applied to t he bottom) to assist in retaining the crank from turning when force is applied to the nut (had I known, I would have favored the device PeterC pictured).

Now, for the leak, When removing the cover, look closely at the timing chain and its hydraulic retainer. When the chain stretches, the retaining piston can be pushed by oil pressure to extend past its limit and fall out of its cylinder. Should this be the case, you will need a new timing chain and retainer. Expect this condition to be most potential if you are seeing lower then standard oil pressure or you have more then 100K miles or more on an original timing chain.

Again, this may be a pain in the .... job but one that is necessary. Good luck and keep us informed,

All the best,
Ray(64BJ8P1)



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-02-15 08:11 AM by RAC68.

San Jose, CA, USA   USA
Cool! Thanks for the tip. Never seen one of those before; hopefully, I don't have to pull the balancer again (just had engine rebuilt).

After replacing the seal, be sure to center it on the shaft. The holes for the timing cover bolts allow for some variance in the placement of the cover; it's possible to put the seal on off-center and, of course, it won't seal well or for long.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2018-02-15 09:22 AM by Bob Spidell.

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