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Sound proofing a big Healey, is it worth it?

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Happy Days Avatar
Happy Days Peter Hunt
Hook Norton, Oxfordshire, UK   GBR
1936 Austin 7 "Flying Teapot"
1936 Riley 9
1965 Austin-Healey 3000 BJ8
1971 Norton Commando    & more
I'm progressing slowly with my BJ8 rebuild and but am reaching the stage where new floors go in and I'm starting to think about whether sound proofing is worth it. To be honest unless I'm touring I only ever take my Healey out in the dry with the roof down so perhaps I don't need to bother but I wondered if any of you had experience of sound proofing. Does it improve the driving experience? What products would you recommend? There's so much to choose from.

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layaj2 Andy Lay
Bisley, Surrey, UK   GBR
Hi Peter

For what it's worth, I haven't installed any, however I have found that I can hold a conversation perfectly well with top down or not, and I don't find road or engine noise to be intrusive over prolonged periods. When I had largely unsilenced V8 big block cars that was a different matter! You may wish to consider doubling up sound proofing with heat protection particularly on the passenger side if you are RHD.

cheers

Andy

Happy Days Avatar
Happy Days Peter Hunt
Hook Norton, Oxfordshire, UK   GBR
1936 Austin 7 "Flying Teapot"
1936 Riley 9
1965 Austin-Healey 3000 BJ8
1971 Norton Commando    & more
Thanks Andy, I have seen some sound deadening products which also have a heat reflective layer so something which does both jobs may be the way to go. The problem is I am 2 years into my rebuild and can't actually remember whether the car was noisy or not and if for a relatively small outlay I can make it quieter and cooler then it's worth considering.

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RAC68 Avatar
RAC68 Raymond Carbone
NJ, Jersey Shore, USA   USA
Hi Peter,

Keep in mind that the products often used for sound deadening are also insulating the cabin from the heat of the engine and exhaust. Although RHD cars have the benefit of having the exhaust running down the passenger side of the car, there is also quite a heat build-up within the engine compartment that often exits down the transmission tunnel and, on long Summer drives, can heat the foot well to the point of fry your feet (no good vent system).

I do agree with Andy that sound deadening during an open cockpit Summer drive provides little difference then having none. However, cabin heat insulation is another story (especially with LHD Healeys) and the products used for sound insulation ae often dual purposed and provide heat insulation as well.

Enjoy your project and your Healey when its done,
Ray(64BJ8P1)



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-03-13 07:51 AM by RAC68.

pkoot Avatar
pkoot Peter K
Alkmaar, NH, Netherlands   NLD
Hi Peter,

I have a LHD BJ8 and do not have any sound deadening products in my car. it's absolute no problem to have a conversation without shouting to each other. But I do have some extra insulation against the heat (and maybe it keeps the sound a little bit away).

We've been a couple of times to Italy, the UK and Germany and have never had any problems with the noise and I've never burned my legs while driving with short pants. Next june we leave again for a long trip to Italy via Germany and Austria. Back home via Switzerland, France, Luxembourg and Belgium. I'm looking forward to it.

Peter

Happy Days Avatar
Happy Days Peter Hunt
Hook Norton, Oxfordshire, UK   GBR
1936 Austin 7 "Flying Teapot"
1936 Riley 9
1965 Austin-Healey 3000 BJ8
1971 Norton Commando    & more
Thanks for all your comments, I think I agree that heat might be the biggest reason for doing this but I quite like the ideas of having the doors shut with more of a thud than a tinny twang.

mpinco Mark Preston
Colorado Springs, CO, USA   USA
I'm in the process of restoring a BN7 and plan on using LizardSkin, a spray-on sound and heat control. The sound control goes on before the ceramic heat control. The plus is that we all know Healey's are not water proof and multiple layers of fibrous material just becomes a sponge that holds moisture. Hoping the LizardSkin reduces the number of layers I need to just carpet.

For tinny doors a thin layer of sound control should work.

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Rob Glasgow Avatar
Lompoc, CA, USA   USA
When I restored my BT7 4 years ago, I installed Hush mat directly to all the interior surfaces including the interior door pockets. On top of that, I applied foil coated bubble wrap to the floor and tunnel. Then carpets with padding. All in all about 3/4" to 1" total. I've owned and driven the car for 55 years and I can tell you all this insulation make a tremendous difference in both interior comfort and overall driving experience. Much quieter and 'solid' sounding. No more tinny sounding doors.
My recommendation is to not miss this opportunity to make this relatively inexpensive upgrade. You will not regret it.

zayante Avatar
zayante Chris Attias
Felton, CA, USA   USA
1964 MG MGB
1965 Land Rover Series IIA "Mrs. Merdle"
1966 Austin-Healey 3000 BJ8 "Louise"
I've been tempted to install heat/sound insulation for a couple of years. Unfortunately, the PO glued the carpets down, so I'm not sure how much damage I'd do pulling it up. I'm intrigued with the idea of installing installation on the underside of the transmission tunnel. The two biggest apparent sound issues I have are fan noise from a large steel six-bladed radiator fan, and some gearbox noise, particularly in lower gears. To be honest, I wouldn't mind having a little more exhaust noise, but installing a BJ7 system would mean removing an almost-new stainless steel BJ8 system.

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gramos Avatar
gramos Graham Foster
Kefalonia, Greece   GRC
It is your choice of course, but if you do decide to insulate/ sound deaden , think about the roof flashing available from builders merchants
, it is self adhesive with thick foil backing and works out far cheaper than the "specialist" sound deadening products !
I used it on my tunnel and bulkhead where it is not visible .

SimsBJ8 Bob Simmen
Raleigh, NC, USA   USA
Inside the trans tunnel I sprayed on Great Stuff Black Foam Insulation then sanded off the excess. It worked great.

Great Stuff 99054816 Multipurpose Insulating Foam Sealant, 12 oz, Black - available on Amazon

RAC68 Avatar
RAC68 Raymond Carbone
NJ, Jersey Shore, USA   USA
Hi Chris,

Sorry to say but don't expect the sound deadening you apply to eliminate or greatly reduce the noise you hear in the cabin from an aggressive fan. Although the sound deadening will greatly reduce road noise, sound generated forward of the cabin, like from the fan, will be carried back on the breeze and the Healeys are to wind-porous to eliminate this flow.

My thoughts,
Ray(64BJ8P1)



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-03-14 09:00 PM by RAC68.

petnatcar Avatar
petnatcar Silver Member Peter Carbone
Watertown, NY, USA   USA
Peter,

You wouldn't think it would do much good in a convertible but I used it to soften the tinny sound and
in that regard it works perfectly.

I used it on the inside of the doors too which gives them a nice solid feel when the door is closed.

The stuff I used is a type of DYNAMAT with an adhesive backing and it sticks to everything.

You can feel the car tighten up as you apply it because of it's sound deadening qualities.

Would you be any relation to James?

Good luck,
Peter Carbone


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Happy Days Avatar
Happy Days Peter Hunt
Hook Norton, Oxfordshire, UK   GBR
1936 Austin 7 "Flying Teapot"
1936 Riley 9
1965 Austin-Healey 3000 BJ8
1971 Norton Commando    & more
Thanks for all these suggestions, some great ideas including the roof flashing from builders merchants. To be honest I was looking at foil covered bitumen based self adhesive products anyway as I fully agree that I don't want any fibrous material or foam trapping moisture. I don't plan on rebuilding the car again. I certainly don't want to lose the exhaust sound but reducing the drum from panels, particularly the doors, and reducing heat from the transmission tunnel are certainly on my list.
James, thanks for the picture, I have heard of Dynamat and I think AH Spares in the UK sell it. I'll investigate. And no I'm not related to James Hunt although strangely we did have one girlfriend in common (not at the same time!).

petnatcar Avatar
petnatcar Silver Member Peter Carbone
Watertown, NY, USA   USA
The DYNAMAT sticks very well to the trans tunnel.

I would have covered the entire tunnel but didn't have enough material so I used
the leftover from the floor with some Thermal Blanket material which I used
between the muffler and floorboards. Every little bit helps.


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