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Wizard Cooling Aluminum Radiators

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zayante Avatar
zayante Chris Attias
Felton, CA, USA   USA
1964 MG MGB
1965 Land Rover Series IIA "Mrs. Merdle"
1966 Austin-Healey 3000 BJ8 "Louise"
I've been considering an aluminum radiator, and I still have questions about is the issues of chemical and stray voltage electrolysis. I've read the FAQ on the Wizard site, and am wondering whether the conditions in an un-rebuilt street engine might accelerate that process.

Some questions:

- If I install the aluminum radiator without a deep chemical and physical cleaning of the block water passages (as you would in a complete rebuild), will the rust still in the cooling system accelerate electrolysis?
- Does the vehicle's electrical polarity affect susceptibility to stray voltage electrolysis? I'm still running positive ground. Needless to say, you wouldn't want to attach the ground on your electric fan to the radiator...
- If I'm going to use waterless coolant to reduce rust formation and electrolysis in the cooling system, is it possible to drain all of the water-based coolant out of the block and heater core?

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Michael Oritt Avatar
LUSBY, MD, USA   USA
Chris--

Aluminum radiators are less susceptible to corrosion than copper/brass ones for two reasons: First, they are generally of all-aluminum construction whereas the solder used in copper rads introduces dissimilar metals in the radiator itself, and secondly the aluminum oxide is very resistant to corrosion.

I can't answer whether positive or negative ground creates more of a risk but if there is no "stray voltage" there will not be any electrically induced corrosion. Common grounding does not introduce "stray voltage" unless you run a hot lead into the equation.

Everything I have read about waterless coolant tells me it is not worth the expense and may not work as well as conventional coolant.

Good luck with the Wizard and please post how it performs--I am interested.



Best--Michael Oritt
1954 Austin-Healey 100 (street)
1958 Elva Courier (track) FOR SALE
1959 Elva MK IV sports racer (track)
1961 Ginetta G4 (track)

zayante Avatar
zayante Chris Attias
Felton, CA, USA   USA
1964 MG MGB
1965 Land Rover Series IIA "Mrs. Merdle"
1966 Austin-Healey 3000 BJ8 "Louise"
As background, my concerns about electrolysis were based on the Wizard Cooling's own blog on the topic at:
https://wizardcooling.com/blog/why-is-my-radiator-leaking-radiator-failures-leaks-and-electrolysis/

WHY IS MY RADIATOR LEAKING? - RADIATOR FAILURES, LEAKS AND ELECTROLYSIS
Posted by Billy Alguire on September 25, 2015

Have you had your aluminum radiator or core leak, then replaced or repair it, only to see it start leaking again within year? Have you had a radiator fail from the inside out due to corrosion or pitting? What about having coolant leaking from the heater core, and the appearance of small black pinholes anywhere on the heater core? Or even a gradual loss of coolant? If you've noticed any of these issues you might be asking yourself, "Why is my radiator leaking?."

Well, any or all of these cooling system failures are tell-tale sign of a common cooling system malfunction know generally as Electrolysis.

Electrolysis is a chemical reaction that takes place between the coolant and metal surfaces and is the result of electricity flowing through your cooling system; causing an electrochemical charge across the aluminum. This can result in the rapid deterioration and corrosion of the components of your aluminum cooling system. Electrolysis can be extremely corrosive, very quickly. If present, it will eat away at the inside linings of a aluminum radiator, usually at the weakest points such as seams and welds. There are actually two different types of electrolysis that can happen in an aluminum radiator, but more often than not; a combination of these factors contribute to rapid deterioration of your radiator:

1. Chemical Electrolysis- This happens when a cooling system has a chemical imbalance due to a foreign mix of metals in the radiator. A mixture of different metals and minerals in a cooling system can actually create electricity, much like a chemical car battery. Water with high trace elements of minerals will create problems for aluminum radiators not normally seen in copper radiators. This can be due to several factors:

Not using a Waterless Coolant or using a 50/50 mix of coolant and NON distilled water (distilled water has no minerals in it)
Recycling antifreeze or not properly cleaning and changing old antifreeze
Lack of maintenance
2. Stray Voltage Electrolysis- When a stray electrical charge from an electrical component is coursing through the radiator (as well as the coolant) and is grounded by the aluminum. Since aluminum is the softest material in the system, this can lead to rapid deterioration of the radiator. Several factors can contribute to stray voltage Electrolysis:

Bad grounds or broken/loose/frayed wires
Electric components not properly installed or grounded
Alternator over charging
Grounding electrical components to the car frame and then mounting the radiator to the frame.
The best method for avoiding electrolysis damage with your High Performance, Wizard Cooling Aluminum Radiator is to be proactive with maintenance of your cooling and electrical systems. ALWAYS ensure that the radiator is not being used as the ground or inadvertently being grounded by other means. Make sure that all electrical component are properly installed and insulated.

We also recommended using a high performance, water less coolants like EVANS NPG Waterless Engine Coolant to avoid the addition of foreign minerals from a water source. It is also important to change your coolant to ensure old coolant (which can be corrosive) doesn't slowly erode the aluminum.

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Michael Oritt Avatar
LUSBY, MD, USA   USA
Chris--

Without trying to go up against Wizard's FAQ advise i can only report that I have AL radiators in all of my cars except for the Healey and have genot had any issues with corrosion.

As to the waterless coolant I would suggest you look around the web--there simply seem to be a lot of negative experiences out there with it and it is quite costly.

Whatever you decide, good luck and please let us know how it goes.



Best--Michael Oritt
1954 Austin-Healey 100 (street)
1958 Elva Courier (track) FOR SALE
1959 Elva MK IV sports racer (track)
1961 Ginetta G4 (track)

Qldelsie Silver Member Giles Cooper
Benowa, Queensland, Australia   AUS
In reply to # 199673 by BobAH100 I'm about to install the same Wizard radiator as well as an uprated water pump (don't trust the County pump the previous owner installed). I too was impressed by Wizard's tech knowledge and the fact that the whole kit and kaboodle is made in upstate NY—not somewhere in China. Further, they explained that their two-row rad is actually better (counterintuitively) than the 3-row Chinese units as apparently the tubes are more robust and expose more coolant to the air with each pass.

QUESTION: I've heard that one of the AH 100 water-pump bolts is more like a stud (Whitworth, I assume) and can get stuck or stripped upon removal. I must also transfer the original wide-belt pump pulley from the old pump to the new, though this looks straightforward given the bolt and slotted keyway. Any hidden/unforeseen issues from other 100 owners on this procedure? Thanks in advance!

Bob, just out of interest, be aware that there are 3 widths of belt pulleys, as we found out to our cost and delay. The pulley on our early1954 car when we got it recently was a narrow one - like 12 mm / .5" lip to lip. So when we ordered a new one from AH Spares, we ordered their "wide one", thinking we already had a "narrow" one. We got sent one that was even wider again than the crankshaft pulley that we got from Denis Welch. So when ordering a pulley, just make sure you are very specific about the one you want, and don't just go with "narrow" or "wide" !! Otherwise you will end up with delays and costs while you sort it out !
Giles



https://austin-healeypekingtoparis2019.blogspot.com.au/
https://www.facebook.com/austin.healey.73113?

Luegolover Avatar
Luegolover Steve L
London, London, UK   GBR
Are the Chinese made rads that bad? They are a lot cheaper.

Luegolover Avatar
Luegolover Steve L
London, London, UK   GBR
I've been and checked my rad and it has damage to the core so I need to do something and the choices are:

Re-con radiator from Ahead 4 Healey's at about £350 including exchange delivery etc.
Find a local guy to re-core my rad?
Wizard rad at £375 plus tax and shipping and import duties
GPI racing rad at £255 delivered.

It seems like a no brainer really. If I were American I would stump up for the Wizard product as it comes well recommended and supports local people etc. but I am not American.

A local guy might be cheaper but I don't yet know and I won't know about the quality etc.

So, I save a few pennies and press a button on my laptop and then, hey presto a few weeks later a rad arrives from China. Struggling to think of a reason not to go this way?

Does anybody know anyone who has used a Chinese rad from GPI racing?

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fts2 Raf S
Munich, Bavaria, Germany   DEU
I just got the 100/4 chinese radiator. It's well made, the welds are looking good, actually it does look 99% the same as the Wizard rad.
Hope it will perform as good as my both other chinese rads fitted to my E-Types.
If you do contact the chinese guys directly, they will be able to do even a lower price. I paid $300 shipped incl. all taxes and it took appr. 2 weeks till it arrived.

Trevor Parker Avatar
Trevor Parker Silver Member Trevor Parker W
Sidney, BC, Canada   CAN
1954 Austin-Healey 100 "Healey Beep Beep"
1955 Austin-Healey 100
A lot of times with these replacement water pumps that are being supplied now you have to grind off the protruding part of the water pump shaft once you have the nut installed. I have installed a pump and then found it impossible to put The fan back on because of the shaft protruding past the nut. And also the nut is longer.
And if you're going to use the heater shut off that's on some cars , you have to remove the glued in water nipple and tap it out to the correct thread size for the brass shut off.
Also be careful of the cast-iron pulley as if you put too much pressure on a pulley you can chip the edges of the pulley. If you think you were applying to much pressure apply a little heat to the pulley .and when you reinstall the pulley make sure it fits fairly snug to that shaft . You should have to lightly press the pulley on to the shaft if it's not tight it will loosen and really create a problem . Cheers Trevor

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Luegolover Avatar
Luegolover Steve L
London, London, UK   GBR
I had contacted GPI to ask for details when I read you post quoting $300 and got a reply saying that they could provide one for £180 delivered. I think I will have to pay some import taxes on top of that but it is pretty cool so I ordered it. Will let you know how it goes.

fts2 Raf S
Munich, Bavaria, Germany   DEU
Sounds good!
My Radiator has been sent to me from the UK so I suppose GPI does have there a warehouse.

Tallanaranaki BN1 allan peters
Keynsham, Banes, UK   GBR
Hi Yes
Wizard cooling highly reccommended.

Was convinced I would need a Kenlowe to prevent overheating in traffic. 222 EMK did get quite warm

The Alloy Rad and its heat dispersion was amazing. instead of temp being towards 212 they only just crept past halfway,

The Chinese Rads look cheap, but the overall quality of Wizard makes it the go for Rad.

All the Welds are very pleasing to the eye



So no buyers Remorse !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Luegolover Avatar
Luegolover Steve L
London, London, UK   GBR
OK, I don't dispute that the Wizard radiator is top quality but I have just received my radiator from GPI racing which cost £180 delivered and the quality seems first rate to me. Take a look.


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San Jose, CA, USA   USA
OT, but I can't help but wonder how those welds were done. At first, they look like TIG welds, but on closer inspection they look like a series of individual spot welds. Strange.

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