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Wiring loom route in 100/4

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Qldelsie Silver Member Giles Cooper
Benowa, Queensland, Australia   AUS
When we started work on our car 9 months ago, the section of the wiring loom in the front of the car that goes to the right hand headlights and side lights was routed down the LH side of the inner guard, near the radiator, then down across the front chassis cross member (along with a brake pipe), and then up to the right hand headlight. I am not sure if this is standard, or whether it was just something done by one of the previous owners.

Amongst other things, we have installed ducting in front of the radiator (as per the 1st photo below) to improve the flow of air through the radiator instead of round the edges of it, and this means the access space for routing of the wires across the lower chassis cross member is limited. In addition, as we are expecting several fairly deep river crossings, we are trying to keep all wiring etc as high as possible. When working on the car this afternoon I looked at the option of taking the wires for the right hand headlight across the upper cross member that runs immediately in front of the top of the radiator. This would keep the wires as high as possible, and seems a perfect option. (See second phto with wires just laid across the beam)

Is there any good reason why we shouldn't route these wires across this upper bar in front of the radiator ? I am going to cover them in heat reflective tube so there is not heat impact on the wiring from the hot radiator tank.

Appreciate any input on this option.

Thanks

Giles



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PAN Avatar
PAN Alwyn Keepence
Ipswich, Queensland, Australia   AUS
Giles, the ducting looks good. It will be interesting to hear how effective it is. But since you have nothing to compare it with, we’ll probably never know!
Regarding the routine of the cables, your proposal should be effective. It you anchor the loom away from the radiator I can’t imagine heat from the radiator will affect it at all.

Qldelsie Silver Member Giles Cooper
Benowa, Queensland, Australia   AUS
Thanks Alwyn. It is always good to have the verbal support of people who know more than I !

As you so rightly say in regard to the ducting, "we have nothing to compare it with" - But then that is true on almost everything we have done with the car. Our exhaust designed by us (albeit with reference to the works cars in terms of routing), our seats, our radiator, our suspension, our sump, and 101 other things. We are just trying to do the best we can to "solve" some of the issues raised with the standard car over the years, so when we have an idea, I like to ask everyone on here for their opinions as to whether it is feasible, or whether I am breaking any known engineering laws !! We have to do the best we can, based on the knowledge and information available, and then keep our fingers crossed.

As far as the ducting goes, it is not just a Healey thing, but a law of physics (I am told !), that the "bow wave" created by the air in front of a car means that air flow will follow the path of least resistance and if there are gaps around the sides or underneath a radiator that are easier for the air to flow through than the relatively congested radiator core itself, then the air will do so - ergo meaning less efficient cooling because air flow through the radiator is reduced.

I also understand (ie have been told !) that on the back side of the radiator. if you have too big a gap between the fan and the radiator, and no ducting on the backside, then the fan can actually pull in hot air from around the engine instead of actually sucking air through the radiator itself, simply because it is an easier flow of air. So now I am looking at afficing some alloy extension strips on the sides of the radiator, and also the top over the fan, to try to help the fan want to suck air through the radiator rather than from elsewhere !

We are also aware of the possibility that by running a full length skid plate, it will be harder for hot air to escape downwards from the engine compartment and out under the car. Thus we have created this adjustable bonnet clip system that will allow us to run with the back of the bonnet open 4 cms to (hopefully) help with the removal of hot air from the engine bay on hot days or in traffic. As per the pics below. When not hot, we can reduce the height of the pins just by unscrewing a short extansion so the bonnet is held fully closed as normal.

Next thing I will have to create a venturi effect somewhere to make it all flow faster !! smiling smiley

Giles



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Vintage n Classic Silver Member Geoff Golding
Nelson, Tasman, New Zealand   NZL
Hi Giles,

Just catching up on some reading and saw your post regarding the ducting in front of the radiator and behind the grill......

When we lived in Sydney before coming here to N.Z. we had overheating troubles with our 100 Healey in Sydney traffic. This was slowly sorted out by a 5 blade fan, replacing the radiator (which was a legacy from when the car was used in "anger on the track"winking smiley along with making sure the motor was tuned correctly.

At the time it seemed logical to close off the gap in front of the radiator (and behind the grill) with a panel fitted to the tray that runs between the grill and the radiator and up to under the shroud so as to force the cool air into the radiator and not down onto the road as was the case when the car left the factory. The panels I made are such with a gap for one side of the steering box which just protruded into the space; I was able to "encourage" the ventilation hose to the drives side of the cockpit to sit above the new panel, it still delivers air into the driver.

The effect was a great success as our overheating problems particularly in Sydney summers "when the sun is frying" you just driving along were a thing of the past. After this modification (given all the water jackets were cleaned out during an engine rebuild) was such that the car very occasionally got to 190 on the Temp gauge sitting in traffic. The other side of this is, now we are living here in a cooler climate I had to play with the thermostat (and take it up a few degrees as we neither have the Sydney heat or traffic density) to ensure the motor gets warm when running along.

Also at the time of making this alteration with the panels behind the grill (painted the same colour as the car and barely noticeable) I fitted a heavy rubber panel (made from a length of wide conveyor belt type material I bought from Clarke Rubber) tightly around the bellhousing so the hot air did not get diverted to the transmission tunnel - this was a by-product of the mods and made driving in the summer quite pleasant

Hope all this helps

Cheers
Geoff g

Qldelsie Silver Member Giles Cooper
Benowa, Queensland, Australia   AUS
Thanks Geoff. Hopefully our temps will stay in the 190 deg range like yours. We will see......

Ref your rubber panel around the bell housing, we have similar already. There was already a rubber "curtain" there when Ashton acquired the car, and all I have done during the rebuild is replace the older torn and slightly persished rubber with new. I used cut down inner tube as it was already curved to fit around the bellhousing. So not as thick as your material from Clark Rubber, but hopefully effective nevertheless. Ironically we have used what is probably the same conveyor belt type rubber as you (also purchased from Clark Rubber !!) but we have used it for mud flaps !! Our entire transmission tunnel is also ilined on the inside with foam backed heat / noise insulation (also purchased from Clark Rubber !) which will also hopefully limit any heat transfer to the interior. However as we do not have a heater in the car, I am starting to think that maybe some of this heat transfer protection should be taken out !!
Giles



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PAN Avatar
PAN Alwyn Keepence
Ipswich, Queensland, Australia   AUS
Giles, the propped bonnet is not a bad idea but could be unnecessary. My car has a standard cast alloy fan, louvred bonnet and modern radiator core and runs at 160F. It does heat up in traffic but soon cools once out of traffic and the air is flowing again.
Cheers,
Alwyn

Qldelsie Silver Member Giles Cooper
Benowa, Queensland, Australia   AUS
I hope you are right, Alwyn. If our engine runs at 160 F we will be very, very happy. smiling smiley
However, the advantage of already having the system to raise the bonnet is that if, for some reason, in the middle of the Gobi desert, we have an unexpected issue (4000 m mountains, temperatures in the 40's (C), or even a broken engine fan or something, and the engine temperatures do increase, then we have the system in place to easily raise the bonnet, which may or may not help.
It is rather similar for the off road tyres with a 500 wear rate, 72 spoke wheels, chassis and suspension reinforcements, two coils wired up, two fuel pumps, two distributors, or many of the other things we have done to the car. We are seriously hoping that everything we do is overkill, and that we won't need any of them. But we have chosen to do them nevertheless because if we find out half way through the trip that we do need even one of them, then it will be too late to install them, and any delays at all will cost us time and potential finishing awards.
But your point is well made, and taken.
Giles



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PAN Avatar
PAN Alwyn Keepence
Ipswich, Queensland, Australia   AUS
Giles,
I should have added when I replied that it looks like you have a new wiring loom fitted in “Gidget”. One thing often overlooked when thinking about reliability is the wiring. And don’t be put off when you hear stories about Lucas connections. Most problems are caused by corrosion on old, loose connections. Properly soldered bullets in new fittings should not give any trouble. Certainly better than some “after-market” connections that I have seen.
Cheers,
Alwyn



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-05-19 02:43 AM by PAN.

Qldelsie Silver Member Giles Cooper
Benowa, Queensland, Australia   AUS
Actually it is not a new loom, Alwyn. We deduce that when the car was converted from LHD to RHD they put a new loom in at that time, however when that took place, we don't know. However the people doing the conversion then used parts of the original LHD loom, and tied it in to the "new" RHD loom, and this old wiring was in VERY poor condition. So when one initially looked at the wiring, one mainly saw the old wiring to the front lights, and also from the cab on back, so to the fuel pump and rear lights etc. So initially we were going to replace the loom, but on closer inspection found the base loom was actually quite good. We then found that the delays on getting a new loom made up that suited all our extra requirements was going to take a long time. And when Steve at CCC looked at our loom, and considered all the changes we wanted to make, he agreed that it would be much easier to amend the existing loom ourselves. As we wanted modern fuses, relays, and a bus bar to easily connect and disconnect rally equipment, we do have quite a lot of new wiring in the system.
So your point is very well taken - More problems are encountered on these rallies with electrical issues, so we have simiplified and reinforced ours as much as possible.
The bullet connectors are fine, as you say, as long as they are properly prepared. Every existing bullet has been polished or replaced. Every single connector, double and single, has been replaced with new - Some were so bad they almost fell apart in our hands. And any corroded or discoloured wires were replaced. We have then sealed the ends of the bullet connections with silicone to help waterproof them a little. However we decided against soldering - We did extensive research on this, and some rally people suggested that soldering actually makes joins more brittle. While for a road going car this may be acceptable, on rough roads with a lot of vibration, we decided against it. The deciding factor was when we spoke to an aircarft electrician, and apparantly no joins are ever soldered in aircraft, due to this increased brittleness. However, this is one of those issues that have deeply divided opinions, like pusher / puller radiator fans, and a number of other issues. So I am not going to say soldering is right or wrong, just that after discussion with many people, and weighing up the pros and cons. we decided against it.
The final electrical precaution is that I am trying very hard to fully understand and know where every single wire goes. I am not an electrician (any more than I am a mechanic) but I am trying very hard to know as much as I can about all aspects of the car.
As always, appreciate your insight and input.
Car now running, and last front bodywork being fitted this weekend. On Monday it goes to Peter Janetzki to have its skid plate fitted - This was all measured up and cut recently and is now reading for fitting. Should be fully mobile very shortly smiling smiley
Giles



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PAN Alwyn Keepence
Ipswich, Queensland, Australia   AUS
Giles, the diagram that I included on page 13 of the May Healey Torque (reprinted- with permission- from the Norman Nock manual) should help you to identify which cable does what.
Cheers,
Alwyn

Qldelsie Silver Member Giles Cooper
Benowa, Queensland, Australia   AUS
Yes, Excellent for a standard wiring loom, Alwyn. But as you can see, ours is not quite standard !! smiling smiley
Giles



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